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Analog clock in slow-motion filmed at 2100fps

The result

The setup

I did not make a photo of the setup, but it is just a light tent with the clock in it. The LED shines into the tent next to the camera.
It was filmed with 2100 frames/sec at a resolution of 1280x720, post processed (brightness curve, crop, ai-denoise) via gmic and mastered via kdenlive.
Tutorials for those programs/workflows will follow soonish.

The background

In the real world, nothing starts or stops moving in an instant. The faster you want to start/stop something, the more force you need.
In case of an analog clock you have the conflicting requirement that the battery should last a long time.
So having huge forces is not an option, that would consume more power. So clock makers only use as little force as possible.
This results in a slow start, but as can be seen above, also a slow stop, here even an overshoot. The second hand goes past the target and swings back. With the naked eye, this is so fast, you can't see it. This is where slow motion footage come to help :)

 

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